If you have ever been on an airplane, you might remember the feeling of getting pushed back from the gate before the pilots start the engines. While some airports always push the planes back, others simply let the aircraft turn away from the gate. Moreover, airplanes are also towed around airports prior to engine start up as well. This is all achieved without the help of the engines, but why is this case? 


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Whether for civil, commercial, or military aviation, all pilots and their crew must regularly use preflight, in-flight, and landing checklists to ensure that everything is operating correctly before leaving or landing on a runway. Aviation checklists include the evaluation of the mechanisms aboard an aircraft and securing components into the right configuration for takeoff/landing. For information about what you might find listed on preflight, in-flight, and landing checklist, we invite you to keep reading as we discuss the most essential aspects of these flight protocols.


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IFE stands for In-Flight Entertainment, and IFE parts are used for the systems installed in aircraft for the entertainment of passengers during a flight. IFE systems are an essential part of aircraft design and have a long history in aviation. IFE systems were first used in post-WWII aircraft on occasion, and they were later installed in many commercial aircraft to improve passenger comfort. While IFE systems have undergone several changes over the years, they continue providing comfortable conditions for passengers during flight.


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The fuselage, along with the cockpit, landing gear, tail, and wings, is one of the main components of a typical aircraft. The word “fuselage” comes from the French term “fusele,” which means “spindle-shaped.” Essentially, the fuselage is the central structural unit of an aircraft, designed to accommodate the passengers, crew, instruments, cargo, and other equipment. 


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Automation is a force that is overtaking countless industries, presenting businesses with the opportunity to make certain processes more efficient and safer. Aviation is no stranger to automation, as many modern commercial flights feature some aspect of processes being fully executed by a computer. As artificial intelligence continues to improve and more capabilities are made possible, it is only a matter of time before more cockpit operations are automated, extending the use of the autopilot system. In this blog, we will discuss the influence automation has had on the aviation industry, as well as where it may go in the coming years. 


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Ground Support Equipment (GSE) plays a significant role in modern aviation operations. Comprised of aircraft mobility elements, cargo loading equipment, power supplies, and other tools, GSE helps prepare the aircraft for its next flight with efficiency. With electrification becoming an increasingly popular trend among airline companies, there has been a recent push to create electric GSE in order to save money and further reduce carbon emissions. In this blog, we will discuss the different types of electric GSE being currently implemented and what technology helps power these green devices.


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If you are a regular flier on commercial aircraft, you can most likely recall most of the common steps for flight preparation, takeoff, and landing. From securing trays to ensuring your belt is buckled, there are many procedures that are standard for each operation. One of these is the dimming of cabin lights, that of which is always conducted for every takeoff when the flight is cleared or during the moments proceeding the wheels touching the runway floor. While passengers may be aware of the rationale behind safety procedures surrounding belts, trays, and seats, they may not be familiar with the reasoning behind dimming lights. In this blog, we will discuss why aircraft interior lighting and fixtures are dimmed during takeoff and landing, and how it promotes increased safety.


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In-flight entertainment (IFE) is often the highlight of flying for many travelers, and it will typically come in the form of airline-provided screens that offer fliers access to music, TV shows, popular movies, and more. While many customers have grown accustomed to such amenities, they are actually a more recent addition to many widebody commercial airliners. Additionally, in-flight entertainment systems in aircraft currently face the chance of being removed due to overall cost concerns for general operations. In this blog, we will discuss the history of in-flight entertainment parts and systems, allowing you to have a better understanding of how they work, and their future. 


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When aircraft operate in areas where there is a risk of ice formation, it is important that ample protection is put in place to ensure optimal aerodynamics and safety during flight. The aircraft deicing system and aircraft anti-ice system are both crucial for such tasks, the former being primarily used before takeoff to remove already established accumulations of ice. While deicing systems can come in the form of a deicer wing component or similar equipment piece, we will focus on the solutions that are applied to aircraft prior to takeoff in particular. 


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While helicopters are considered to be a type of aircraft, they are quite different in structure and operation as compared to the fixed-wing aircraft that most are familiar with. Similar in their ability to maintain heavier-than-air flight, one of the main features of helicopters is their ability to hover in place while midair. To make such capabilities a possibility, helicopters and their pilots take advantage of various control systems, structures, and parts that are present on the aircraft.


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Whether boarding cargo onto a passenger or cargo plane, all pilots must follow strict regulations and limitations regarding the security and weight of payload placed within an aircraft's empennage. Following applicable regulations and limitations based on specific aircraft structures, operator loading instructions are given to those responsible for loading and unloading cargo from aircraft. The operator loading instructions must match limitations and requirements as indicated on an aircraft trim and load sheet. It is important that all personnel follow any procedures and specified limitations to mitigate operational safety issues, bulk loading issues, and other regulations for abnormal loads. 


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Aircraft are vehicles capable of sustaining flight in the air, often coming in diverse forms such as fixed-wing aircraft, rotary-wing aircraft, gliders, and other types. The fixed-wing aircraft is the most popular of all, regularly used for personal travel, business, shipping, and other applications. While coming in a number of shapes and sizes, fixed-wing aircraft may share some similar structural components with one another, such as those on the airframe. As the mechanical structure of the aircraft, the airframe is the section of the vehicle that will typically contain the fuselage, undercarriage, empennage, and wings, all of which are crucial to flight. In this blog, we will provide a brief overview of the primary airframe structural components, helping you better understand how they function together to make a fixed-wing aircraft what it is.


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Since the 1950s, the use of materials like magnesium, fabric, and wood in aircraft construction has largely disappeared. Use of aluminum, which was once found in 80 percent of airframes, has also reduced to about 15 percent today. Replacing these materials are non-metallic aircraft materials, such as reinforced plastics and advanced composites. In this blog, we will look at one of the most commonly used non-metallic aircraft materials: transparent plastics.


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Aircraft fuel system leaks are very hazardous situations as they can lead to fuel tank depletion, cause fires, and generally pose a major safety risk to an aircraft and its passengers. Fuel leaks can happen from a variety of situations such as a fuel tank or fuel line rupture, and various guidelines are given to pilots to assist in determining the affected area. While rare in occurrence and fairly preventable with proper maintenance and aircraft handling, pilots should always know how to quickly identify and combat fuel leaks when they occur for the safety of all on the aircraft.


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In order for an aircraft to safely land on a runway, reduce its speed, and undertake taxi operations, they rely on aircraft brake systems. While brakes are paramount for reducing speed, they must be used correctly and responsibly in order to maintain efficient control of the aircraft and to ensure that brake parts do not fail unexpectedly. In this blog, we will discuss the aircraft brake system and its functionality, as well as provide tactics for correctly using such equipment. 


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For many who travel regularly on aircraft, the in-flight entertainment system proves to be one of the most enjoyable parts of the experience. With such systems, one may watch a variety of TV shows, blockbuster movies, and other forms of entertainment over long flights. As more airliners move towards cost reduction and new avenues to streamline services, however, the future of in-flight entertainment systems is one that may feature many great changes.


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Regular inspections are an important aspect of ensuring an aircraft remains safe for flight. Because they must be done at regular intervals, mechanics and technicians are often looking for the quickest and least invasive methods of inspection. One such method is through borescope inspections. A borescope inspection is a type of visual inspection that can be done to examine inaccessible or difficult-to-reach parts and components without disassembling or damaging them. Disassembling an aircraft engine can be complex, expensive, and potentially very risky, making non-destructive testing techniques such as borescope inspection vital to technicians seeking to evaluate the condition of engine parts. Furthermore, borescope inspections can also bolster flight safety by quickly detecting aircraft engine defects before they create significant problems.


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Accessorizing your car or truck is one of the best ways to make improvements without the expense of a completely new vehicle. A common addition to most trucks, especially if its height makes it difficult to get into, are running boards. A vehicular running board is a narrow step fitted under the side doors of a tram, car, or truck. The origin of the name running board is not known, but the first running boards predate vehicles and were installed on carriages as early as the 17th century. It helps passengers enter the vehicle and is more common in trucks and vintage cars which have significantly higher ground clearances than today’s vehicles. Although modern cars have been lowered, running boards remain a desired attachment for many large car and truck owners. 


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A thrust bearing is a type of rotary bearing that provides high load capacities in harsh environments. This type of bearing is designed to work parallel to the shaft of a machine and deliver high axial load capacity. Other types of thrust bearings with different design aspects and dimensions offer different performance, load carrying capacity, and precision. This blog will cover thrust bearings in detail, including their applications, materials, and types.


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Self-clinching fasteners are threaded nuts, studs, or standoffs that are mechanically pressed into metal, therefore becoming a permanent part of the panel, enclosure, or bracket. Each self-clinching fastener is used for something different. Nuts accept bolts and screws to hold components securely in place. Stand-offs are mainly used to mount circuit boards, so they are not shorted by contacting sheet metal that has an electrical current flowing through. They also help prevent overheating. Studs are used to mount connectors or other components by providing a threaded screw within the enclosure. Self-clinching fasteners can be one of two types: flush-head or concealed-head. This blog will cover both types and how they are used.


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When designing and operating aircraft, one important consideration that is always taken into account is stability and balance control. Balance control refers to the center of gravity of an aircraft, and it is crucial to be aware of it as the aircraft center of gravity can highly affect safety and performance. The center of gravity of an aircraft is considered the point in which the total weight of the aircraft is concentrated, and thus it must be kept within specific values for safety. In this blog, we will discuss stability and balance control of aircraft, as well as the various ways in which such factors are maintained.


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Over the past years, aircraft of all types have been facing a plethora of changes, both in regards to physical and performance characteristics. One facet of aircraft that has seen significant changes over the past decades is the aircraft cockpit and instrument panel, introducing a variety of advanced systems that have enabled more control of the aircraft for the pilot.


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Cabin management systems in the modern day world are much more advanced than when they were first introduced. Modern cabin management systems have in-flight entertainment systems, DVD players, flight data recorder, audio reproducers, video reproducers and much more. These can be seen in many different types of designs including those manufactured from Avionics and In-Flight Entertainment (IFE) Parts, Goodrich Interiors, Rockwell Collins, Honeywell. If you are interested in learning more details on aircraft cabin cabin management systems, read the article below.


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Throughout the history of aviation, engineers have constantly looked for newer and better materials to improve upon the performance of aircraft. In recent years, we have seen a major push into the realm of aircraft composite materials which have allowed manufacturers to reduce the weight of structures and overcome engineering barriers. Aircraft composite materials are those that are composed of two or more materials, and they often consist of fibers that are suspended in a matrix of epoxy resin. By recognizing the history, benefits, and challenges of aircraft composite materials, we can best understand the future path of aircraft manufacturing.


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Across the technology that we rely on every day for various activities, there are many smaller internal components that provide critical functionality for those systems. An electromechanical linear actuator is a component that belongs to the Federal Supply Class 1680 Miscellaneous Aircraft Accessories and Components. Electromechanical linear actuators are a specialized type of actuator that transforms rotational motion into linear motion, typically in the form of a push or pull movement. These components may be used for a variety of applications, including furniture, medical systems, and industrial processes. In this blog, we will discuss what electromechanical linear actuators are, a few common types, and how they benefit the systems they are featured in.


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Kitting refers to the process of collecting individual components that are required for a specific maintenance or repair procedure. This procedure is done so as to ensure that all parts are put in stock and prepared for the time that it comes to use them. Kitting benefits everyone including the aviation Maintenance, Repair, Overhaul (MRO) department, ticketing and boarding team, and even the passengers. As MRO situations usually mean that aircraft will be grounded for a long period of time, many facets in the aviation process are impacted. With aircraft kitting, the MRO department helps to reduce the lengthy wait times that often come with maintenance.


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The aircraft power plant, otherwise known as the aircraft engine, is the heart of the vehicle that provides for the generation of thrust and propulsion. Without some form of aircraft power plant, planes would not be able to achieve flight. Typically, the size and application of the aircraft determines which type of power plant is optimal, such that small planes are most often fitted with piston engines while larger planes may feature a gas turbine. In this blog, we will provide an overview of a few of the standard types of power plants and how they help aircraft achieve flight.


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When at an airport or while in flight, you may have noticed the curved wingtips of airliners that many aircraft feature. These curved wing tips are called aircraft winglets, and they serve a very important purpose for efficient and safe flight. There are also many styles of winglets that may be featured on a variety of aircraft models. In this blog, we will discuss what winglets are and their benefits to flight.


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With the many in-flight entertainment options that we have at our disposal today, it is interesting to think that most of them have not been around for very long. In-Flight Entertainment (IFE) traces its history all the way back to the 1920’s with the screening of Howdy Chicago for passengers as a means of advertising the movie. IFE was not the biggest concern of the aviation industry, and the technology to successfully implement it did not exist. Zeppelin flights such as the Hindenburg offered entertainment to its passengers, including a piano, bar, lounge, dining room, and more. Meanwhile, aircraft had much less means to provide such pleasures.


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When procuring components, one may see many different designated standards. Military standard parts in particular often confuse some, especially when deciding which part is best for their needs. Oftentimes, some may even face trouble discerning the difference between a military standard part and a similar component that is not. In this blog, we will discuss what a military standard part is, and the history behind them.


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Along with the constant evolution and change of aircraft instruments and components that commercial airlines utilize, airlines have begun looking towards the future of passenger seating. Over the years there have been many designs from various manufacturers and airliners for how we can revolutionize seating. From pod seating to outright removing all seats, finding a balance between comfort and profit is the main concern of designs. In this blog, we will take a short look at some of the differing designs that have come out in recent years.


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Virtually all types of machinery used in day to day life are reliant on pneumatic and hydraulic power systems. From car brakes to construction equipment, from elevators to automated doors, hydraulic and pneumatic systems allow for actuation and control over devices that is efficient and responsive. While they share many similarities, and sometimes share components like pumps and valves, hydraulic and pneumatic systems differ in how they provide force and control for their attached actuators.


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Bearings are a critical component for numerous primary and auxiliary systems in aircraft, such as navigation, landing gear, flight controls, generators, hydraulic pumps, and cabin climate control. Choosing a specific bearing is more than finding the best and most inexpensive deal upfront, however. When considering a bearing solution, the total life cost equation should look something like this:


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Airplanes are an intricate feat of engineering and the components that combine to make one are equally complex. There are five pieces that make up an aircraft that we will be covering in this article.


The largest component on an aircraft is the fuselage. Also known as the body of the plane, the fuselage houses the passengers and pilots, cockpits, and cargo. It is the hub of the plane connecting all the other parts of the aircraft.


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The chances are that your bedroom window is either square or rectangular. Your airplane window, however, will always be circular While this is an obvious statement, the fact that your house is designed to stay on the ground while an aircraft is designed to fly in the air explains the difference in window designs. Unlike your house, an aircraft is subject to differing levels of atmospheric pressure, which must be considered when designing aircraft windows.


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The Pilot in Command (PIC) and the co-pilot share responsibilities and control of the aircraft, but the PIC is ultimately responsible for the aircraft, crew, and passengers. In certain operations, the PIC may also be titled the Captain and the co-pilot may be titled the First Officer. Regulations do not govern which seat the Pilot must sit in. However, in a fixed wing aircraft, it’s traditional for the PIC to sit in the left seat and the co-pilot to sit in the right seat, so we wonder why it’s often the opposite for the pilots in a helicopter. Well, it’s all about the design of the helicopter and the fact that most people are right-handed. And what does handedness have to do with where they sit? It gives them an operational advantage.


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When original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) are producing parts and equipment for interior design, they can face quite a few challenges. With such close interaction with passengers, interior design must simultaneously provide excellent customer experience, and efficient and low-cost maintenance and operations of an aircraft. The three main design parameters that a manufacturer must consider include the demand for fuel efficiency, fast manufacturing speeds, and aircraft security.


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